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Posts tagged ‘onion’

Food Links, 18.07.2012

Rebuilding agriculture in Egypt.

The launch of the Global Food Security Index.

How the size of fizzy drinks has increased in the US.

The rise of ‘single estate milk‘ in Ireland.

The cost of coffee.

Why British dairy farmers are protesting at a drop in the price of milk.

How Kraft tests its products on children. (Thanks, David!)

Fake meat comes ever closer to being a reality.

No chips other than McDonald’s chips are to be allowed in the Olympic park. Madness.

The politics of free milk.

The worryingly high incidence of bisphenol A in humans.

Constructing Korean identity and food.

Marcella Hazan, Facebook enthusiast.

A riposte to ‘self-righteous vegetarianism.’

What criticism of fast food says about our relationship with food.

An interview with Jay Rayner.

Who’s caused the elderflower shortage?

Surströmming.

A lovely article about Escape Caffe in Cape Town.

On the continuing success of Coca-Cola.

Reading and eating.

A girl and her pig.

Hints and tips for dining etiquette.

Fuchsia Dunlop on the pungent cuisine of Shaoxing (and more pictures here).

A guide to Greek cooking.

The Ideal Cookery Book, by Margaret Alice Fairclough.

The Coalition against Brunch.

Five of the best trattorias in Rome.

Vegan taxidermy.

Margarine and fizzy drinks. (Thanks Dan!)

Kenyan tea.

How to get people to shop for groceries in the nude.

The world’s largest coffee mosaic.

The trend for bitters in cocktails.

Fried sage leaves.

Recipes for blueberries. (Thanks, Simon!)

Britain’s changing food scene and the London Olympics.

Supermarkets and the threat to the Amazon. (Thanks, David!)

Are all calories the same?

How to chop an onion.

Hyper-real paintings of puddings.

The history of the fork.

Ten made-up food holidays.

Can food photography make you hungry?

Japan rethinks its relationship with food. (Thanks, Mum!)

Urgh: the cheeseburger-crust pizza.

How to eat cheese and biscuits.

Breakfast-shaped earphones.

A poem about olives.

Why wasting food is bad for the environment.

The Cake Museum in Los Angeles is under threat.

How cupcakes may save NASA. (Thanks, Jane-Anne!)

Food Links, 19.10.2011

Lifestyle-related diseases are increasingly a problem in the developing world too.

So fast food is always cheaper than home made? Think again.

Bizarre culinary gadgets.

Dinner and derangement (thanks Sarang!).

A Swedish TV cook causes a nationwide shortage of butter.

Why the food movement should Occupy Wall Street.

A quick history of domestic lighting.

Live the cliche: how to be a Brooklyn urban farmer.

An interview with Andrea Illy, CEO of Illycafe – with some interesting insights into the implications of food speculation.

How to set up and run a restaurant in a field.

Kit Kats in Japan.

The art of the menu.

New York ‘beeks’ (bee + geek = beek) celebrate the first year of legal bee-keeping in the city.

Why it’s worth growing your own chillies.

In praise of Vegemite.

Ethiopia plans on becoming one of the world’s top exporters of sugar. Hmm…

On errors in cookbooks.

The world’s biggest onion.

The average American eats forty-two pounds of corn syrup every year.

How to cook scotch eggs.

Food Links, 14.09.2011

The Observer profiles Britain’s new young farmers, Sarah Boden, Ed Hamer, and Richard Thomas.

Check out Sonia Cabano’s review of the Toffie Food Festival.

A slide show of New York’s hot dogs.

There is such a thing as honey laundering.

‘An additional Walmart Supercenter per 100,000 residents increases average BMI by 0.25 units and the obesity rate by 2.4%.’ And there are fifteen more amazing/appalling facts about Walmart here.

On changing attitudes towards restaurant staffs’ tattoos.

David Lebovitz discusses his favourite pudding recipe books – and is interviewed by the Financial Times.

Consider chocolate.

A brief history of menu design in the United States.

A list of favourite French recipes by Julia Child.

Jay Rayner interviews David Tanis, the head chef at Chez Panisse – and here are some of Tanis’s recipes.

On the history of biscuit embossing.

It would seem that the company providing food parcels to the poor in Britain…has links with the Tories. Funny, that.

Rene Redzepi explains the thinking behind his Mad Food Camp.

These flags made of food are surprisingly lovely.

More from What I Eat: Around the World in Eighty Diets.

How to chop an onion. (Thanks Mum!)

The perils of restaurant reviewing.

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