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Posts tagged ‘Darth Vader’

Food Links, 07.03.2012

Why cupcakes must not be allowed to take over International Women’s Day. (Thanks, Ella!)

Top five meat substitutes.

This is fantastic: the Walkin Kitchen.

Giving battery chickens a second chance.

Cooking sous vide at home. (With thanks to Dan Kemp.)

Why cooking on clean stoves will improve health and save lives.

American meat consumption has actually dropped by twelve percent over the past five years.

The mass production of communion wafers. (Thanks Mum!)

One day, you will play video games with a pig.

How to choose the perfect chicken.

The decline of the pop-up restaurant and the rise of the no-choice restaurant.

Five packaged foods you never need to buy again.

Gay food?

The Darth Vader burger.

How to keep avocados from turning brown. (Thanks Dad!)

No maple syrup by 2100?

The US army has made a sandwich that stays fresh for two years.

How to survive the midwest: a guide for vegetarians.

Cupcakes: more dangerous than you would imagine. (Thanks Jane!)

The makers of Twinkies are (financially) bankrupt. (Here’s a quick look at some of their other products.)

Vegan bodybuilders.

Barbara Demick on Kim Jong-Il’s eating habits.

Marshmallows: the new cupcakes?

A fork in the road for Slow Food USA?

The growing vogue for chia seeds.

The countries that eat the most and the least.

An interview with the Skint Foodie.

So what’s really in diet soft drinks?

This is ridiculous.

Edible packaging.

Other ways to use Angostura bitters.

Food Links, 04.05.2011

John Crace digests Gwyneth Paltrow’s Notes from my kitchen table. Read and weep.

Is it cheaper to be a meat-eater, vegetarian, or vegan?

The New York Times argues against increasing efforts to prevent scrutiny of factory farming in the US.

This enterprising chef has written a recipe book about chillies and climate change.

Who should control the world’s seed supply: farmers or the evil empire Monsanto?

I don’t have much time for PETA, and this ad simply confirms my annoyance.

Adults’ height is a reliable indicator of childhood disease, nutrition, and poverty. Height improved all over the world after the middle of the twentieth century – but a recent study suggests that in the past two decades the average height of women in very poor countries has been falling.

The Guardian describes the royal wedding menu.