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Posts tagged ‘David Lebovitz’

is on holiday.

I’m away this week and will be spending the rest of the month eating. Hurrah! But I leave you with some holiday reading:

A ‘Jewnitarian‘ Christmas.

How to bake two perfect Christmas cakes: by Felicity Cloake and Edd Kimber. (This is an interview with him.)

David Lebovitz on Christmas in France.

Seventeenth-century decorations for mince pies.

A frugal Christmas cake for the recession from the Observer.

Yum – panettone.

Eva Wiseman on the Christmas sandwich.

Making Estonian blood sausages for Christmas.

It’s time to make latkes.

Christmas recipes from Nigel Slater, Giorgio Locatelli, Sam Harris, and Jacob Kenedy.

Two of my favourite things: stollen and egg nog.

Christmas in Mexico.

Christmas recipes for those of us sweltering in the southern hemisphere.

Also, the Design Indaba magazine’s theme for its final edition of the year is food and design. Do take a look. (I’ve a piece in its Food Fight section, but don’t let that put you off.)

See you in 2012.

Food Links, 14.09.2011

The Observer profiles Britain’s new young farmers, Sarah Boden, Ed Hamer, and Richard Thomas.

Check out Sonia Cabano’s review of the Toffie Food Festival.

A slide show of New York’s hot dogs.

There is such a thing as honey laundering.

‘An additional Walmart Supercenter per 100,000 residents increases average BMI by 0.25 units and the obesity rate by 2.4%.’ And there are fifteen more amazing/appalling facts about Walmart here.

On changing attitudes towards restaurant staffs’ tattoos.

David Lebovitz discusses his favourite pudding recipe books – and is interviewed by the Financial Times.

Consider chocolate.

A brief history of menu design in the United States.

A list of favourite French recipes by Julia Child.

Jay Rayner interviews David Tanis, the head chef at Chez Panisse – and here are some of Tanis’s recipes.

On the history of biscuit embossing.

It would seem that the company providing food parcels to the poor in Britain…has links with the Tories. Funny, that.

Rene Redzepi explains the thinking behind his Mad Food Camp.

These flags made of food are surprisingly lovely.

More from What I Eat: Around the World in Eighty Diets.

How to chop an onion. (Thanks Mum!)

The perils of restaurant reviewing.

Food Links, 03.08.2011

‘It’s very difficult to define’ – the Staggers attempts to pinpoint what is meant by ‘British food’. And gives up.

Eating while black: on food and race.

The Middle Class Handbook considers the rise of strange snack foods.

McDonald’s removes McFalafel from its menu in Israel.

Twelve signs that we’re running out of food.

David Lebovitz lists ten strange things to be found in French supermarkets.

We need a ‘brave new menu’ to be the basis of a sustainable food system.

Surprisingly, America doesn’t consume the most meat in the world – take a look at this fantastic infographic to see which country does.

Where do baby vegetables come from?

The equitable redistribution of rigatoni. (Thanks, Mum!)

What are the chances of substitutes – like seitan and soy – replacing meat in our diets?

Check out Nourish – an amazing project aiming to raise awareness about food and sustainability in schools and communities.

‘encouraging agricultural diversity and local food production – particularly of vegetables – can help communities boost their self-sufficiency and protect vulnerable populations from price shocks’. In other words, the diversity and quality of the food supply are more important than quantity in ensuring food security.

Ferran Adria has written a book about cooking staff meals.

Where is all the safe drinking water?

This is the most amazing project: what we eat.