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Posts tagged ‘Middle Class Handbook’

Food Links, 05.10.2011

The best and worst places for vegetarian travellers.

Things are looking up for bottled beer in Britain.

Pissaladiere.

A useful infographic on food speculation and global hunger.

Farming after the Fukushima disaster.

How pure is the milk we buy?

On the Irish Famine.

Did you know that Cape Town has more than 3,000 micro-farmers? Here’s a video of them too.

Farmers in Vermont rebuild after Hurricane Irene.

Use food to show your support for Occupy Wall Street.

What a novel idea: making gelatine from human DNA. (Which makes one totally rethink jelly babies.)

An ode to mutant fruit.

Sam Clark from Moro shows how he makes the restaurant’s sourdough bread every morning.

The second hungriest state in the US is…Rick Perry’s Texas.

The Middle Class Handbook ponders the caffeine-averse.

Snacks of the great scribblers. (Thanks Mum!)

Almond and yogurt cake at Design*Sponge.

Macaroon wars.

A socially-responsible approach to dairy farming in the UK.

Knitting + baking = cupcakes in the shape of balls of wool. (Thanks to Jane-Anne!)

Food Links, 03.08.2011

‘It’s very difficult to define’ – the Staggers attempts to pinpoint what is meant by ‘British food’. And gives up.

Eating while black: on food and race.

The Middle Class Handbook considers the rise of strange snack foods.

McDonald’s removes McFalafel from its menu in Israel.

Twelve signs that we’re running out of food.

David Lebovitz lists ten strange things to be found in French supermarkets.

We need a ‘brave new menu’ to be the basis of a sustainable food system.

Surprisingly, America doesn’t consume the most meat in the world – take a look at this fantastic infographic to see which country does.

Where do baby vegetables come from?

The equitable redistribution of rigatoni. (Thanks, Mum!)

What are the chances of substitutes – like seitan and soy – replacing meat in our diets?

Check out Nourish – an amazing project aiming to raise awareness about food and sustainability in schools and communities.

‘encouraging agricultural diversity and local food production – particularly of vegetables – can help communities boost their self-sufficiency and protect vulnerable populations from price shocks’. In other words, the diversity and quality of the food supply are more important than quantity in ensuring food security.

Ferran Adria has written a book about cooking staff meals.

Where is all the safe drinking water?

This is the most amazing project: what we eat.